Recycling

What you need to know:

All students will receive their assignments back once they are graded, but may always pick up their quiz/test/assignment from the red-orange Paper Pass Back bin located on the back counter, when they finish their work early instead of waiting for an official Paper Pass Back.

The assignments that are eligible to be recycled are up to teacher discretion and NOT all assignments are able to be recycled.

The following was taken directly from the class syllabus:

Assignments which are recyclable will be dependent upon teacher discretion. Students who choose to recycle an assignment can earn up to half of the missed points. For example, if a student earns a 50 on an assignment, then he or she may recycle for up to a 75. Recycling does not guarantee a student the maximum amount of points possible. Meaning, the aforementioned student is not guaranteed a 75, but can earn up to a 75 depending on the quality of work.

Recycle points will not exceed 100% and students may only recycle each assignment one time.

 

Recycling Directions:

1. Write your answers (as specified below) on the FRONT of a separate piece of filler/notebook paper. Typed responses are NOT accepted. Full possible points will NOT be earned if you write on the back of the paper.

2. Staple this paper to your original assignment and turn in by the due date. Recycled work is NOT accepted late and NO credit will be earned without original work.

3. PART 1 – Justification: for every missed answer write your (wrong) answer and the correct answer, like so:

The justification is simply the answer you chose and the correct answer.

4. PART 2 – Evidence/Elaboration: for every missed answer write the evidence/explanation of why you got the answer wrong.

The evidence/explanation is explaining why you got the question wrong. It will look different from student to student and may include evidence from the test/context clues to help you explain your original misunderstanding. It may be as simple as failing to study or narrowing it down between two words and choosing incorrectly.

The evidence/explanation is explaining why you got the question wrong. It will look different from student to student and may include evidence from the assignment/context clues to help you explain your original misunderstanding. It may be as simple as failing to study, narrowing it down between two answers and choosing incorrectly, or misreading the question.

5. PART 3 – Next Steps: explain what you can do to avoid these same mistakes on future assignments. Similar to the evidence/elaboration section, answers will vary by student. Here is an incomplete list of some possible answers:

  • Develop positive study habits (including, but not limited to: using methods recommended by my teacher, adopting methods used by my classmates who are scoring what I’d like to be scoring, study without distraction, research new methods for studying, find methods that work for me, etc.)
  • Read the directions to be sure I fully understand what the question is asking me to do.
  • Mark the test/scratch paper to rule out answers which may distract me from the correct one.
  • Resist changing my answer unless I realize I have misread the question because I know my first choice is  generally the correct answer.
  • Look at the clock after answering X number of questions, so I can learn to better manage my time (whether I rush through my work or am unable to finish in the allotted time.)
  • Double check my answers/response before submitting to avoid careless mistakes.